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Nonimmigrant Visas

The categories of nonimmigrant visas read like alphabet soup and are notated by a letter-number combination as appearing on the I-94 Arrival-Departure Card.

A Diplomats and foreign government officials
B Visitors for business or pleasure (B-1/B-2 information)
C Transit visa
D Crewmen
E Treaty Traders and Investors (E-1 & E-2 information)
F Students (academic) (F-1 information)
H Temporary Workers
I Representatives of foreign media
J Exchange Program students, scholars, trainees, teachers, research assistants, medical graduates, etc. (J-1 information)
K Fiancees of U.S. citizens
L Intracompany transferees (L-1 information)
M Students (vocational) (M-1 information)
N Parents or children of an alien accorded Special Immigrant status
O Individuals with extraordinary ability in the arts, sciences, business, athletics, movies, or television
P Athletes and entertainers - highly qualified individuals / groups as well as accompanying group members
Q Participants in international cultural programs
R Religious workers
S Individuals coming to the U.S. to testify in a criminal proceeding
TN Canadians and Mexicans entering under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

D - Crewmen

D-1 Visa

Crewmen serving in good faith for normal operations aboard vessels may apply for the D-1 Visa. This classification includes musicians, stewards, technicians and chefs. The applicant may temporarily remain in the U.S. and may only partaking in his/her 'crewmen' duties while in the U.S. The applicant’s vessel cannot be involved in fishing, and its home port must be in the U.S. D-1 Visas may be issued for individuals or for an entire crew.

D-2 Visa

Crewmen serving in good faith for normal operations aboard vessels may apply for the D Visa. This classification includes musicians, stewards, technicians and chefs. This visa is specifically issued to a crewperson who serves aboard a fishing vessel with a home port or base of operation in the U.S. The applicant should plan to land in and depart from Guam as a part of his/her crew duties.

NOTE: Immigration law changes frequently. The resources and information provided on this web site are intended to help you understand basic issues involved in the immigration process, and are offered only for general informational and educational purposes. This information is not offered as, nor does it constitute legal advice or legal opinions. Although we strive to keep this information current, we neither promise nor guarantee that the information is the latest available, or that it applies to your specific situation. You should not act or rely upon the information in these pages without seeking the advice of an attorney.

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